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Cbd oil for dogs experiences

I Gave My Dog CBD Oil To Calm Him Down and Help His Separation Anxiety

The first time I heard about cannabis products for dogs was when a video of Permit Patty , the CEO of a pet cannabusiness, went viral after she called the cops on a young girl selling water. Since then, I’ve been intrigued by the idea of pets using drugs. So I decided to volunteer my own dog for a Weed Week assignment: I was going to see how he responded to cannabidiol (CBD).

I adopted Bishop from Davidson County Animal Control last August when he was about a year old. Someone found him running around the Nashville streets and sent him off to the shelter. No one claimed him for a month, so I decided to make him a Davis after falling in love with his face online. Shortly after the adoption, I signed him up for basic training. We had some rough patches along the way, but he’s been a different dog since his graduation and I worry a lot less when we leave the apartment together.

Bishop Davis after graduating the first level of behavior school.

It’s when I leave him in the apartment that the problems begin.

Bishop is crate-trained, so I put him in his nook with some toys, treats, and calming music if I have to leave the apartment for a short period. If I anticipate a longer time away from home, I let him roam the apartment with toys, treats, and calming music. (I’ve read that crating a dog for too long can have detrimental effects on its mental state.) But each time I leave Bishop to roam free, I almost always hear clawing at the door and crying moments after I shut it.

When I come back, it always looks as though a tornado flew around the room. Bishop knocks down furniture and tears through books and papers. One time I returned to find that Bishop had managed to unlock the front door. While some of this could be chalked up to him being a puppy in need of some more training, I wondered if CBD could help him. CBD has only been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a therapy for two types of treatment-resistant epilepsy in children, but a growing body of research suggests it can treat anxiety as well.

Perhaps it could even treat anxiety in a dog.

The prep: I reached out to Bishop’s trainer and to Jason Amatucci of VA Hemp for some thoughts on my assignment.

“We have found that many pet owners that use CBD for their cats and dogs really love it and say it works for tackling problem behavior or just giving their pet a better sense of overall calm,” Amatucci told me. This is comparable, he explained, to the way CBD can reduce anxiety in humans.

Amatucci noted that unlike CBD, THC is actually quite bad for pets. Should a pet mistakenly consume a product with THC in it, a vet can administer activated charcoal to the animal. He added that while CBD products have a trace of THC, it’s “not at a level which would cause toxicity.”

I also asked Bishop’s trainer about using CBD products for pet anxiety since he knows my dog’s temperament the best. Essentially, he told me that he’s heard of other pet owners using it with success. And since he didn’t say anything bad about using it, I decided to continue with the project.

I looked up local CBD shops in Nashville and found no shortage of retailers that carried pet-specific products. I decided to use an oil since it had more potency and could be delivered on a treat, and chose a formulation that apparently tastes like bacon.

Day 1: I decided to take Bishop to the Nashville Cherry Blossom Festival. I woke up early to go to Mass and came back just in time for Bishop’s morning feeding. We had a few hours until we had to meet some friends at the festival.

I grabbed a hard treat and poured a dropper-full of CBD oil on top (the recommended dose was one dropper-full twice a day). I put the treat up to his nose. He sniffed it and turned away.

Lacing his treats.

Oh fudge , I thought.

Bishop will eat anything and everything, except medicine. Bishop is so anti-medicine that his vet once wished me luck when I said I didn’t have anyone to help me pour his eye drops. This was after it took three of us to hold him down in her office so she could administer the first dose.

I mentally kicked myself for not considering this possibility and wondered what to do. Then it hit me that I still hadn’t fed Bishop.

I had him sit and wait while I poured his food in a bowl. Then I placed the laced treat in the middle, hoping he would accidentally eat it.

The sucker ate it.

Later, I filled a backpack with water, a collapsible water bowl, and some training treats, and we made our way downtown to the festival.

On the drive, I wondered what I could expect for the day. Bishop doesn’t bark often, but he can get pretty rowdy if the wrong type of dog passes by. Would the CBD reduce his tendency to lose his mind?

As I wondered this, Bishop was running across the backseat of the car to hang his head out of both windows. Apparently, the oil hadn’t kicked in.

And honestly, it never really seemed like it did.

Bishop did well with the training treats, socialized with the other humans, and didn’t make any attempts to eat food that didn’t belong to him. He even let some of the bigger dogs (his favorite kind) sniff his butt.

The butt-sniffing was about to commence.

But none of this stopped him from freaking out when the wrong sort of dog passed by. He was so crazy that he started to jump on the girls we were hanging out with at the festival. I had to apologize several times and use some basic training tricks to get him to calm down.

The other girls eventually wanted to go up to the observation deck, so I said Bishop and I would take the stairs and meet them there. Halfway up, Bishop’s back legs began to shake.

Oh no , I thought. I’ve poisoned him .

I didn’t actually think that he was having a reaction to the CBD oil, but I always briefly entertain the craziest possibilities when it comes to animals (or babies) doing things that I don’t understand. Following a water break and a quick trip to the bathroom, Bishop felt better. Then we tried to rejoin the girls, and Bishop’s legs started to shake again.

And that’s how I learned that despite our hikes at Percy Warner Park, one of the highest points in Nashville, my dog is actually quite terrified of heights.

After Bishop and I got home, I made some dinner, fed him once again, and crocheted while we watched some movies. I chose not to give Bishop the second dose since he was pretty calm for the rest of the evening.

Day 2: Remembering what happened yesterday, I poured Bishop’s food and placed another laced treat in the very middle. He ate it, but not before taking it out of the bowl to inspect it first. Then my own anxiety began to build up.

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Just eat it already.

Today was Sunday Mass, which runs a whole heck of a lot longer than daily Mass. It was time to let Bishop roam the apartment alone with my poor, vulnerable books and furniture.

I got dressed for Mass and positioned the gates of his playpen in such a way that he’d have to grow human legs in order to reach the front door handle. I left some treats around the apartment, put on some calming nature sounds, and sweated bullets while I begged St. Francis and St. Roch to intercede on my behalf while I was gone.

Then I left. I didn’t hear any scratching at the door or crying.

The Palm Sunday Mass was longer than usual. There was the distribution of the palm fronds, a long procession into the church, and the interactive Gospel reading was several pages long instead of several paragraphs. The homily also lasted a bit longer. While everything was beautiful and I left feeling assured about my spiritual life, it didn’t stop me from worrying about my apartment as I drove home.

Once inside, I was thoroughly surprised that other than the barrier having been moved, the floor was clear of paper bits. I mentally prepared myself for the worst of it as I walked towards the main part of my apartment.

Where, it turns out, Bishop was relaxing in his crate.

He raised his head and his ears fell while he looked at me. He only does that when he knows he did something wrong.

I checked the rest of the living room, the dining area, the kitchen, my bedroom, and even the bathroom. I couldn’t believe that everything was untouched. I secretly thanked the oil and the saints while continuing to look for whatever made Bishop’s ears go droopy.

Then I noticed that the blanket I put over my Lovesac was knocked to the floor and there were remnants from Bishop’s toy on top. Considering he is well aware that he’s not supposed to be on there, I concluded that this was the worst of the offenses.

We spent the rest of the day doing some work and getting prepared for the Game of Thrones premiere. I opted against the second dose again because Bishop was otherwise calm.

What did I learn? At the end of the day, I don’t know that the oil had much of an effect on Bishop.

He clearly suffers from some separation anxiety, and he can be aggressive with other dogs. As with humans, drugs can only fix so much of an animal’s psychology. I’m also not sure what I can tell from just a couple of doses. I will admit to hoping that the CBD drops would essentially be a miracle cure. That, after just a dose or two, he wouldn’t be a bad dog ever.

Clearly, CBD is not a miracle cure for rowdy boys.

Still, I’m open to using it again the next time I leave him home alone. After all, with the exception of the playpen and the beanbag, this was the first time Bishop didn’t completely destroy the apartment.

So Bishop can go ahead and enjoy his CBD treats for several Sunday masses to come. As for his behavior when we go out, it looks like I’ll be calling his trainer soon.

Does CBD Work for Dogs?

Topper, a 7-year-old Ibizan Hound, could hardly walk after being diagnosed with severe arthritic changes due to Valley fever. “The pain became so debilitating he had to be carried outside to eat, drink, or use the bathroom,” recalls owner Christy Moore. “He was on pain medication but it wasn’t working. A friend recommended pet CBD. Within three days he could walk on all four legs and I was crying tears of joy. It was the miracle we needed.”

Lady Amelthia, a Greyhound, was so petrified of thunderstorms she would destroy a crate to escape. “Holding her only made her claw to get away. A ThunderShirt reduced her from 100 to 90 on the anxiety scale,” recalls owner Jenn Boswell, director of the Alabama Greyhound Adoption Center. “Veterinary-prescribed trazodone took it down to a 50. Tried three drops of CBD oil and it went down to a 5.”

Success stories abound of dogs overcoming anxiety, slowing seizures, and even beating cancer due to cannabidiol (CBD), one of more than 100 cannabinoids found in cannabis plants. But how can one substance help so many unrelated problems? Or can it?

Cannabinoids are substances including CBD and THC that mimic the endocannabinoid chemicals naturally produced in all vertebrates. Receptors for endocannabinoids are found throughout the body. The body’s endocannabinoids act as master regulators that signal other systems when to speed up or slow down, working to stabilize the body and return it to homeostasis. Cannabinoids from the cannabis plant affect these same receptors, each in slightly different ways. For example, THC causes a high, while CBD does not.

Is It Harmful?

Unlike THC, which can cause toxicity and even death in dogs when given at prescribed human dosages, the worst CBD has been documented to do is cause diarrhea and changes in some liver enzyme values after several weeks. The main concern with CBD is that it inhibits a chemical in the body called cytochrome P450 that is responsible for metabolizing most drugs. If a drug’s efficacy depends on its metabolized product, CBD could render it less effective. If a drug’s safety depends on it being cleared from the body within a certain time frame, CBD could cause it to build up to toxic levels. Never give your dog CBD without your veterinarian’s knowledge if your dog is taking other drugs.

Does It Work?

Research with dogs is still scarce, but there’s a huge body of research (about 23,000 published papers!) looking at CBD’s effect on laboratory animals and humans, with encouraging results for pain, especially arthritic pain, itchiness, anxiety, and cancer, all of which have at least one canine study as well. The results in dogs? It depends.

Arthritis: Several studies have looked at CBD’s effectiveness against arthritic pain, all with positive results. A Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine study found dogs given CBD at a rate of 4.4 mg per pound twice daily for a month showed significant improvement in pain relief and quality of life. Lead investigator Joe Wakshlag, DVM, Ph.D., DACVN, said that some dogs were initially so decrepit that their owners considered euthanasia, but that after just days on CBD they were trotting around and even climbing stairs. A Baylor University study found similar improvement, adding that CBD worked better when delivered in a liposomal formulation.

Itchiness: Two recent double-blind, placebo-controlled dog studies report CBD significantly reduces itchiness. An Australian study conducted by the company CannPal found their CBD product reduced itchiness, inflammation, and skin lesions by 51 percent after eight weeks of treatment. An American study conducted by the company ElleVet found their product, which combines CBD with another cannabinoid, CBDA, significantly reduced owners’ reports of itchiness.

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Cancer: Cannabinoids are reported to induce cancer-cell death and prevent metastasis. In a Cornell University study of CBD, dogs, and cancer, researchers found CBD along with a standard chemotherapy drug reduced cancer-cell proliferation in vitro more than the chemotherapy drug alone. Anecdotal reports from veterinarians have claimed CBD shrunk cancer cells or put dogs into remission.

Behavior: Anxiety, and especially noise reactivity, is a major reason dog owners seek help using CBD. But despite anecdotal reports of its effectiveness, no controlled study so far has shown it to be particularly effective. A study from the University of Western Australia may show promise for aggressive behavior. Shelter dogs with aggressive tendencies exhibited less aggression toward humans when tested after 15 days of CBD administration. In a study from the University of Kentucky, physiological measurements of anxiety in response to noise were not significantly different for CBD versus placebo, and were worse compared to trazodone (a drug commonly prescribed for anxiety). Note, however, that in this study the CBD was administered four to six hours before testing, which may have been too long a waiting period.

Seizures: Lots of anecdotal reports hail CBD’s success combatting seizures in dogs, but the single controlled study delivered moderate results. In this Colorado State University study, dogs given CBD for 12 weeks had 33 percent fewer seizures than those given a placebo, but it didn’t work for every dog. These researchers are now working on a larger trial using higher CBD doses. Note that THC has been reported to cause seizures, so it should never be included in any CBD product for seizure control. In addition, CBD’s effect on cytochrome P450 could interfere with prescribed anti-seizure drugs, so never use it without your veterinarian’s consent.

Other: There’s also evidence from laboratory animals that CBD is effective in promoting bone healing, fighting infection, treating inflammatory bowel disease, slowing degenerative myelopathy, quelling nausea, and relieving pain, but these have yet to be specifically examined in dogs.

How to Choose CBD For Dogs?

With hundreds of CBD products on the market, and little regulation of them, it’s not easy to know which is best. Look for a product with the National Animal Supplement Counsel (NASC) Seal of Quality Assurance, and one that has a third-party certificate of analysis that includes potency, lists all ingredients, and discloses the possible presence of heavy metals, mycotoxins, or pesticides. Avoid edible products formulated for human consumption, which often contain ingredients such as xylitol that are toxic to pets.

Choose broad-spectrum products, which include other cannabinoids and substances known as terpenes that are also in the cannabis plant. CBD seems to work best when it’s in conjunction with these rather than isolated. But avoid full-spectrum products that include THC.

Aim for about 0.1 to 0.2 mg per kilogram of your dog’s weight, given twice daily by mouth. Work up gradually, but beware that more is not always better with CBD, as sometimes the response is biphasic, meaning that it doesn’t work if you give too little or too much.

Is It Legal?

Many veterinarians are reluctant to suggest CBD, whether because they believe CBD is not yet sufficiently proven helpful or because they fear professional or legal repercussions. CBD products are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for dogs, but neither are common supplements such as glucosamine or fish oil; nor the majority of human-approved prescription drugs routinely prescribed in veterinary practice.

While it is legal to sell hemp-derived products containing less than 0.3 percent THC, until recently the American Veterinary Medical Association did not approve of veterinarians suggesting any cannabis products, including CBD, for patients. Even now, the law is unclear enough that many veterinarians fear repercussions if something went wrong due to their suggestion of CBD.

While some veterinarians are hesitant to suggest CBD, almost all are eager to discuss it once you bring it up. Of course, some veterinarians are more versed in its pros and cons than others. The main concern is its possible interaction with prescribed drugs.

Overall, the evidence is compelling that CBD can help at least some conditions. The endocannabinoid system is the largest system in the body, and the least explored. Every year brings new discoveries—and new claims. It’s the beginning of a brave new world of health, but as with any new path, expect some wrong turns, dead ends, and false hopes. CBD is not a miracle drug, but it may be the miracle your dog needs.

This article originally appeared in the award-winning AKC Family Dog magazine. Subscribe today!

CBD Oil for Pets: Success Stories

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil is derived from cannabis. Unlike marijuana products, CBD oil is non-psychoactive and doesn’t create a high because it has low-THC content. This makes it a safer alternative, while still providing health benefits.

Recently, people have turned to it as a way to help their pets suffering from physical and behavioral ailments. Although still controversial, it is revolutionary for many pets who have struggled otherwise. Here are some success stories from around the country. Before you try it on your pet (or yourself), be sure to do your research and always seek the advice of your veterinarian.

Brought Back From the Brink of Death!

Emma Smith of Sherman Oaks, California started using CBD oil on her 13-year-old Pomeranian, Tinkerbell, about a year and a half ago when she was battling liver disease and having chronic seizures. She was unable to walk, eat, or use the bathroom on her own, so Smith knew she didn’t have much time. Her vet said the best thing would be to euthanize her, so she made the appointment.

At the last minute, based on a recommendation from her local dispensary, Emma decided to try CBD oil to make her comfortable in her last few hours. That night, she gave Tinkerbell a dose of CBD oil before bed and the next morning she was walking, using the bathroom on her own again, and had no seizures! She marvels, “we are still not sure how it all works, but CBD has kept our little girl alive for a year-plus longer than we expected!” Emma cautions, “the dosage is tricky at first, but we are so happy to have found CBD for our pets! We’ve continued to use CBD to control the seizures and it has worked ever since. it’s been almost 2 years, and we have seen our pup do so well on the oil that we will never stop using it. Still doing great, she’s about to have her 15th birthday, and we couldn’t be happier!”

Three Years of Sickness Halted!

Toby is a 7-year-old Great Dane/Akita mix who lives in Santa Clarita, California. His mom, Jordan, says Toby had terrible stomach problems from the moment they brought him home from the shelter at 2 months old; he vomited and had watery bowel movements every single day. “It was a struggle to convince him to eat because he knew he was going to get sick,” Jordan says. Over the years, they spent thousands of dollars trying to figure out what was wrong, to no avail. In 2013, figuring they had nothing to lose, Jordan tried Canna-Pet CBD oil on Toby. It totally changed everything. Now Toby doesn’t fight Jordan during mealtimes; he eats willingly, and there’s no more vomit or diarrhea. And so far, there have been no side effects. Jordan has been so impressed by the results that she says, “I use it on my feral foster, whom I couldn’t even touch because of her anxiety. She’s been on it for 6 months, and I can touch her, put a leash on and off her, and she will come when I call her!” Jordan also noted that her cancer-stricken hospice dog, who hadn’t been eating before the CBD oil, is now eating and much more comfortable. And she’s been lucky that her vets have responded favorably to this: “they were supportive and said they would do research themselves on it. They admitted nothing was working, so they didn’t object to trying an alternative.”

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Life-changing for Abused and Neglected Dogs

Jeanie Shulz is a rescuer and provider of foster/adopter and behavioral support in the Portland, Oregon area. Over the past 20 years, she’s worked with upwards of 1,000 dogs that have special medical needs or are victims of severe abuse or neglect. The vast majority of the dogs she works with are older and have a variety of medical problems (ranging from arthritis to cancer) and severe anxiety/fear/aggression. She first learned about CBD oil from a friend who is a cancer survivor and firm believer in it. Of the 60 dogs she’s currently working with, she has 17 on CBD oil that have been taking it for various lengths of time, ranging from one week to six years.

Overall, she’s had tremendous success and only one mishap: “I’ve only had one dog that probably got more than she should have because she got into the bag of CBD cookies and ate several. She got disoriented and off-balance for a few hours and was fine the next day. That was the only negative response I’ve had and that was very minor,” she says. In all of the dogs, she saw a positive result after using it for about a week to two weeks with no interruptions. For the dogs w/ medical needs (in particular arthritis), it’s as if their joints get “oiled,” resulting in much less discomfort and more ease of movement throughout their daily activities. For example, one dog named Xena (pictured) was unable to sit and had trouble walking short distances due to severe abuse. She is now a “prancer” after being on it about two to three months, goes on short walks, and is able to sit and lie down comfortably. She’s even able to lay out and stretch on her back for a belly rub. none of which she could do before. “In all of the dogs”, Jeanie says, “I’ve seen definite improvement and no one acts ‘drugged’ or listless. It’s very gentle, unlike synthetic pharmaceuticals and all the dogs who have had bloodwork recently are doing well. their numbers look better than they ever have.”

No Longer Plagued by Thunder and 4th of July

Annie Bahr of West Chicago, Illinois got her now ten-year-old dog Cubbie from a rescue when he was only 6 weeks old. He was a great dog, trained quickly, and had no issues. But suddenly, when he was about 5 years old, he became scared of fireworks, so she got him a compression shirt to help him with 4th of July. “That did nothing,” Annie says, “Cubbie went into our basement and shredded a 5 x 5 foot area of brand new carpet.” A year or so later the fear/anxiety progressed to include thunderstorms. The vet gave Cubbie some anxiety meds, but they did nothing. He still was terrified and they were always scared that he was going to have a heart attack. As the years have gone on, his anxiety over storms and fireworks continued. Annie says, “I tried every ‘calming’ treat on Amazon that I could and even melatonin. Nothing worked. I have about 6 different areas in my home that are completely shredded.” This year, Annie’s father was diagnosed with stage-4 lung cancer. While researching, she stumbled on the benefits of CBD oil. While her father was too advanced in his sickness, Annie looked into it for Cubbie. She didn’t wait long to try it, because “the next day, we had HUGE thunderstorms. Worse than I could remember. I was afraid to try the CBD oil, so I used his melatonin treats. They didn’t seem to work. He was so upset and terrified, I decided to try the oil. Within about 10-15 minutes, Cubbie was laying by our feet on the couch as we watched TV and listened to the thunder roll. It was amazing. I have not used it since as we have no had any more big storms, but I have it ready to go and would recommend it to anyone!”

A New lease on Life – and Business

CBD oil came into the life of Beth Ann Corr of Boston, Massachusetts when her 14-year-old Sheltie, Tamu (pictured), was diagnosed with sarcoma and also had pretty serious arthritis. He was on oral chemo, and she wanted something without side effects for the arthritis. She saw a very short piece on the local news about a woman who was giving her dogs CBD biscuits and it piqued her curiosity so she set out to learn more. She found a supplier, started giving it to Tamu, and saw results!

Beth Ann says, “Tamu had not come up stairs in over a year and a half, and after about 2 weeks on the CBD, he bounded up the steps and was also able to jump in the car again! The CBD was also very helpful in keeping up his appetite during chemo.

Tamu passed away recently and Beth Ann has since adopted another Sheltie named Jazz, who was “extremely fearful of everything and very noise phobic,” so she started him on CBD and he has become a different dog.

Not only does Beth Ann supply her own dogs with it, but she is so impressed by the results, that she helps others too! After she started sharing the oil with others, “the feedback was so positive (for a variety of issues) that a business partner and I started up our own website” she says. Business is good for them, and she loves teaching others about it. She says, “it is a real education process; some people have never heard of CBD, or are under the mistaken impression that their pet will get high.”